Centenary of WW1; Kilmore Remembers: Samuel Ernest Crane

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Private – 2140

Samuel Ernest Crane was born in Kilmore in 1882, the son of Thomas and Sarah Elizabeth Crane (nee Wortley). He attended the State School at Kilmore. He later enlisted in the 5th Victorian Mounted Rifles as a Shoeing Smith and served in South Africa in 1901.

His occupation before World War One is recorded as an engineer in Kilmore. At age 32 years, Ernest enlisted on 4 March 1915 at Mildura as a private in the 6th Battalion AIF. His prior service was recognised as he was promoted to Corporal in June 1915 and in the same month to acting sergeant.

Samuel embarked on HMAT Wandilla in Melbourne on 17 June 1915. He reverted to private when he landed in Gallipoli in August 1915 and after being wounded he was first transferred to Mudros on Lemnos Island in September, then, via Egypt, to Hampstead Hospital in England in early October 1915. He remained in England for over a year in a training role and was promoted to sergeant.

But Samuel volunteered to return to the Western Front in France in October 1917, on the basis of reverting to private. He took a week’s leave in England in March 1918 and returned in time to take part in the defence of the German Spring Offensive.

Samuel was shot in both feet on 16 April 1918 and died of his wounds on 20 April at Hazebrouk, France. Private Crane was buried in the Arneke British Cemetery at Cassel, France. A memorial service for Samuel was held at the Kilmore Methodist Church on Sunday 19 May 1918.

Samuel’s family received a memorial scroll and his British War Medal, Victory Medal and 1914/15 Star. His name is recorded on the Kilmore War Memorial, Shire of Kilmore Honour Roll, and the Kilmore State School Honour Roll. Samuel’s name is also recorded on the family headstone in the Methodist Section of the Kilmore Public Cemetery.

Reproduced in the North Central Review, 3 March 2015, p10

Centenary of WW1; Kilmore Remembers: Charles Oscar Axen

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Corporal 5034

Charles Oscar Axen was born in Karlsborg, Sweden in December 1880 and arrived in Melbourne on the Orotana on 13 March 1902. He lived at High Camp for nine years, Western Australia for two years and Pyalong for two years, occupation labourer. Charles married Eleanor Maud Lawrence in 1905 and by 1916 they had four children.

At age 35 years Charles enlisted on 20 January 1916 at Melbourne and after training embarked for overseas on 16 July on the HMAT Suffolk. Before he left Charles became an Australian citizen in June 1916.

After a short period in England, Charles joined his Battalion, the 7th, in the Somme in November 1916 and within a month he was suffering trench fever. In January 1917 he was transferred to Horton Hospital, near London, and later to the 67th Battalion in a training role. Charles was promoted to Lance Corporal in April 1917.

Charles returned to France in October 1917 to take part in defending the German Spring Offensive. On 9 June 1918 he was promoted to Corporal. During the early days of the Allied Hundred Days Offensive, the 7th fought a major action at Lihons and on the first day, 9 August, Charles received gun shot wounds in his left leg. Within four days he was admitted to the Cambridge Hospital in Aldershot, England. After recovering and taking leave, he embarked on the HT Karmala on 2 January 1919 for Melbourne where he was discharged on 1 April.

On Friday 7 March 1919 at the High Camp hall, a large attendance of local citizens gave Charles a warm reception and presented him with a sum of money in appreciation of his three years active service.

Charles received the British War Medal, the Victory Medal and 1914/15 Star. His name is recorded on the Pyalong Shire Honour Roll and at the Glenaroua Public Hall. The Axen family later moved to Mildura where Charles died in 1955.

Reproduced in the North Central Review, 3 March 2015, p10

Centenary of WW1; Kilmore Remembers: Agnes May Semple

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Nurse

Agnes May (May) Semple was born in 1879 in Kilmore to Dr William Henry Semple and Anne Devon. May trained at St Vincents Hospital in Melbourne. She enlisted in the Australian Army Nursing Service in May 1915 and served initially at the Military Hospital in Geelong until August 1916, then at No. 5 Australian General Hospital, St Kilda Road, Melbourne.

In January 1917 May embarked on the Omrah in Melbourne arriving in Plymouth, England on 27 March. She undertook nursing duties at Weymouth on the south coast and at Southall, London, before returning to Australia on the Llanstephen Castle in February 1918. May nursed the injured on board and arrived in Melbourne on 16 April 1918.

Nine months later Nurse Semple sailed from Sydney on the Wiltshire arriving in Suez on 11 December 1918. She nursed at the 31st and 27th General Hospitals in Abbassia, Egypt. May returned home on the troopship Ceramic in February 1919 and during the voyage performed nursing duties, including cases of influenza which caused the ship to be quarantined for several days off Geelong and Sydney.

Nurse Semple was discharged from the Australian Army Nursing Service on 9 May 1919, and was awarded the 1914/15 Star, the Victory Medal and the British War Medal. She carried on her nursing career and retained an interest in the welfare of 1914-1918 veterans.

May was admitted to Kew Hospital on 13 September 1954 and died on 24 September aged 74 years. Her burial service was held at Christ Church, Kilmore, and at the graveside was attended by many old friends and former service members of both World Wars and included the RSL Service. Her name is recorded on the Kilmore Shire Honour Roll and the Anglican Church Honour Roll.

Agnes May Semple-2
Nurse May Semple

 

Reproduced in the North Central Review, 9 December 2014, p6

 

Do You Remember? Kilmore, January 1970

The following featured in the Kilmore Free Press, Thursday 15 January 1970, page 4.

Here and There

Back to the grind for another year to bring you the latest and greatest.

We will try to present this column as regularly as possible during 1970, but please excuse us if it does not appear, as it all depends on time and space available.

____ X _____

Nice winter we are having this summer isn’t it?

How would you like to have paid big money to buy a milk bar at a beach resort, only to find holiday weather like we had?

But most of the beach belles got their sun tan under a ray lamp this season.

Thousands may have flocked to the bayside resorts expecting good beach weather, but judging by the number of cars passing through Kilmore, there were thousands who were awake to the un certainty of the Victorian climate and chose the country for their holidays.

Still can’t work out how that fellow seen in Sydney Street during the holidays managed to hang on to his trousers, after losing his belt, without dropping his armful of bottles.

Belt was still on the footpath the next day, but no sign of broken bottles.

Notice that Santa delivered a fair number of swimming pools to homes in Kilmore at Christmas.

We won’t need that proposed, delayed and almost forgotten public pool soon if he keeps that up each year!

Hear there is a move on to change Fighting Harada’s name to Dancing Harada after his fight last week with Australian champion Johnny Famechon. All the Jap. boy seemed to do was to hold our Johnny as if he wanted to dance… and then he was waltzed right out of the ring.

Local vet, Pat Mornane, has some pretty odd jobs to do at times, but one of his oddest came last week when he was called to remove a possum from a washing machine in the laundry of a Kilmore house.

Heard it said the other day that “Doc” Davon would probably be the first local fisherman to catch a fish which was larger around the girth than the angler who landed it.

See a quote by Shakespeare on the desk calendar yesterday read – “nature hath framed strange fellows in her time.” How very true!

Do You Remember? Assumption College Speech Day 1982

The following article featured in the Kilmore Free Press, Wednesday 22 December 1982, page 8.

Were you present? Did the Headmaster’s address impact on your life? Did he give good advice? Does it apply today? Did you enjoy your time at Kilmore’s Assumption College? What do others think?

Tough times … young people need to be resourceful and adaptive

Times are indeed tough for our young people, and they need to be resourceful and adaptive, while not becoming a “Jack of all trades and master of none”, Assumption College Headmaster, Brother Seamus O’Grady, said at the school’s annual speech day and prize-giving.

“The 90th year of the college’s existence has witnessed new developments in buildings, curriculum and student responsibilities. These are things that give us all much satisfaction, a feeling that the college is progressing, that it is adapting to meet the changing needs of our students and the society into which they must enter.

“But the life of the college has to be seen against the background of the world of the 80’s. An education that isolates itself from the context of its own society runs the risk of becoming increasingly irrelevant to the young people we serve.

“The gloom of recession hangs over our country, unemployment is taken for granted, even the drought has contributed to lowering our collective morale.

“Times are indeed tough for our young people. They need an education to at least year 11, which in turn can no longer be narrowly academic. “Career choosing” is the preserve of the intellectual elite. For most it is a question of adapting to what is available, rather than what they feel best suited for.

Security Not There

“Here you noticed how the term ‘dole bludger’ has dropped from our vocabulary and has been replaced by terms like ‘retrenchment’, ‘early retirement’, ‘job-creation’? Security is simply not available to many people.

“How does the school respond to this situation? On the one hand, it must to some extent shield its young ones from these harsh realities, to give them time to grow physically, mentally, emotionally … to give then an all too short space for being adolescent.

“With no time to dream visions of the future, our youth become too quickly disillusioned and disappearing. Small wonder that so many seek to live only for the present, indulge in drugs that numb the mind from reality.

On the other hand, school must gradually expose them to the complexities of life, the ambiguities of a society with which they must come to terms. This is no east task. It is a lot simpler to concentrate on reading, writing and arithmetic as some naive commentators claim to be the major function of a school.

“what advice can I give you parents? For a start, if you are comfortably secure, why not in a real spirit of Christian caring create jobs for young people? Give the young a chance to be productive. It will only cost you money!

“Secondly, be on guard against ‘single-issue education’, an education which focuses on only one aspect of the student’s development. A too narrow academic education – in itself no guarantee of adequate employment – may neglect the emotional and social aspects of human development, and produce a distorted human being incapable of entering a loving relationship.

“I am not suggesting that everyone should be a ‘Jack of all trades and master of none’, but, rather, that our young people need to be resourceful and adaptive.

Dignity and Value

“They are living in a world which regards change and new directions as commonplace in the human condition. Teachers and parents, drawing on experience and wisdom, need to ensure a balanced education is provided for the young people who are entering a society where survival may require a lot more than a job.

“ All activities that we enjoin on them should lead to a renewed sense of their own dignity and value, a quiet self-confidence, a warmth of character, and, importantly, a sense of humour. I guess Christ is still the best model of man to offer to young people.

“So schools and parents have to adapt. Caring for our young people requires a vision that are valuable beyond their productivity. We have to make greater efforts to discern their needs, capabilities and skills, to develop courses that address these needs, to work more closely with them as they move from the world of school to the world of work”, Brother Seamus said.

Guest Speaker 7 Apr 2015: Kath de Grauw – Victoria Barracks, Melbourne

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KILMORE HISTORICAL SOCIETY GENERAL MEETING
TUESDAY 7 APRIL 2015

Our April General Meeting will be held at the Kilmore Court House, 4 Powlett Street, on 7 April at 7:30 pm.

Make sure to attend and hear from guest speaker, Kath de Grauw who will give a talk about Victoria Barracks, Melbourne.

Kath de Grauw joined the Army at 17 (whilst living in Kinglake) and served for 25 years, the last five years as a Reservist. She now works in the Learning and Development field (Training) and works in the Victoria Barracks in Melbourne. Kath is a volunteer tour guide (in training) and took on this additional role as she simply loves the history that surrounds her each day.

Kath is also the curator at Seymour and District Historical Society in addition to newsletter editor and research officer for 2015 and is responsible for the displays.

In her spare time, Kath is researching a property in the Western District where the first lease was taken up in 1841. She is also a quilter, avid reader and just generally believes that life is there for the taking.

The meeting will end at approximately 9pm and be followed by supper.

All members and non-members are welcome to attend.

Photo: Victoria Barracks, Melbourne by Nimish Jha; licensed under Flickr Creative Commons

Kilmore District Local Communities

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Kilmore Historical Society just added a new Local Communities page to our site under About Us.

The Society does not deliberately collect material in relation to the following local communities, although the Society will consider accepting donations of documents covering these communities where no historical society exists.

In addition to the items listed on the page, it is likely that there will be specific information on these communities in records that appear to be Kilmore items. For example, some localities will be referred to in local histories on Kilmore, and Wandong areas are covered for some periods in the Kilmore Shire Rate Books.

Communities listed include Beveridge, Broadford, Bylands, Clonbinane, Darraweit Guim, Donnybrook, Glenaroua, Heathcote Junction, Hidden Valley, High Camp, Kalkallo, Kilmore East, Lancefield, Mandalay, Moranding, Pyalong, Reedy Creek, Seymour, Tallarook, Tantaraboo, Tooborac, Tyaak, Upper Plenty, Wallan, Wallan East, Wandong and Willowmavin.