Centenary of WW1; Kilmore Remembers: George John Hale Still

Australian_Army_Rising_Sun_Badge_1904

Service Number:1911

George Still was 25 years and 9 months when he enlisted for service on April 18, 1916, in the 41st Battalion 2nd Reinforcements.

He was born in Kilmore to Annie Maria Lamb and James Still, a Boer War veteran. George was a cousin of Sydney George Still.

He was the eighth of 10 children over a 24-year period. The first eight were to James while they lived at Goldie and the last two children were to unknown fathers while Annie lived in Melbourne.

George was listed as a butcher and married to Elsie Matilda in South Casino, NSW. He embarked on “Boorara” from Brisbane on August 16, 1916, with the 41st Infantry Battalion and disembarked two months later at Plymouth harbour in the UK.

He was marched in to No. 3 Com. Depot and was detailed for home service. Mid-November he was marched to 11th Signal Battalion. By June of 1917 he was at No. 2 Com. Depot at Whymouth.

In September 1917 he returned to Australia and was discharge medically unfit with asthma and haemorrhoids in November. Meanwhile his brother, James Oliver Still of Church Street, Kilmore, was writing to Base Records requesting information about Pte. Still’s return to Melbourne.

In October 1919 he was applying for assistance under the War Service Homes Act while living in Casino. He married Elise Matilda and had one son named Cyril.

He wrote to the Officer in Charge of Base Records in November 1923 to ask if he was entitled to the Victory Medal and was informed that as he did not serve in a theatre of war prior to November 1918 he was not entitled.

He was awarded 1914/15 Star and the British War Medal and is listed on the Kilmore Presbyterian Church Honour Roll.

George enlisted in WWII on January 10, 1942: Serial No. N393423. He was demobbed from the 11th Australian Garrison Battalion on March 3, 1943.

George died on October 23, 1962, and probate was granted on February 21, 1963, and is registered at the Western Sydney Records Centre, Kingswood.

Reproduced in the North Central Review, 17 March 2015, p12

 

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