Category Archives: 1980s

Athletics in the 80’s – Part 3

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1987

Kilmore Free Press
Wednesday, 2 December 1987, page 23

More Records Tumble

Last Saturday was another record breaking one for youngsters who were competing in Hume Little Athletics Centre events.

No club records were broken, but 30 competitors bettered their previous personal best performances. Several bettered multiple records.

The outstanding performers were as follows:

Under 6: K. Howells in 100m, 70m;
S. Cameron, 70m and high jump;
K. Snelson, 70m and high jump.

Under 7:
S. Bernard 200m and long jump;

H.Martin, shot put and long jump.

U8:
M. Briant, 70m and long jump;
A. Hocking, 70m, 100m and high jump.

Under 9:
L. Anderson, 400m, 100m, shot put & long jump;
S. Cross, 100m and long jump;

I. Calleja, shot put and long jump.

U10:
N. Smythe, 200m, 100m and discus;
T. Cameron, high jump and discus;
J.Evers, high jump and discus.
U11:
D. Hardwick, lOOm, shot and long jump;

B. Martin, 100m, long jump and shot put.
U12:
D. Hocking, 200m, 100m and discus;
B. Wolfe, 200m and long jump;
J. Humm, 100m and discus.

Special congratulations to Lauren Anderson, who bettered all her times and distances in each event she tackled.

Additional children from Broadford, Wandong, Wallan, Pyalong, Kilmore, interested in participating in Little Athletics are urged to come to Assumption College, Kilmore, on Saturdays at 9 am and follow the signs to the competitors’ oval.

 

Athletics in the 80’s – Part 2

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1985

Kilmore Free Press
Wednesday, 18 December 1985, page 15.

The true spirit of competition!

The first Mini-Olympics held at Kilmore attracted 150 youthful competitors.

All competed in the full spirit of fun and fitness, the hallmarks of the Little Athletics movement.

The day at Assumption College were organised by Hume Little Athletics Centre in conjunction with Kilmore Lions Club, as an International Youth Year activity.

Federal Member for McEwen, Peter Cleeland, read a message from Prime Minister Bob Hawke to the young people of the Kilmore district.

Mr Cleeland, in company with Kilmore Shire President, Cr Robert Lowden, presented the various winners with their medals.

Centre officials also add their congratulations to all the competitors, irrespective of whether they won a medal or not; the overall participation ensured the day was extremely successful.

President of Little Aths Centre, Coral Jennion, presented special awards to two youngsters who showed true Ònever give up spiritÓ, namely Wayne Montgomery and Jessica Smith.

Special thanks was expressed to Assumption College on the manner in which the ground was prepared for events, and to Lions Club members who worked tirelessly all day.

President of the Lions, Bob Rowe, suggested all meet again next year to continue the spirit of community participation.

He acknowledged the efforts of all in working together for the happiness and better understanding that Youth Year conveys.

Results of the various events were as follows:

GIRLS

U5: long jump K Fowler 1, E Blandford 2, C Sanders 3; shot put – K Fowler 1, E. Blandford 2, C Sanders 3.

U6: 70 m – K. Jain 1, D Callaghan 2, M Zoch 3; long jump – D Callaghan 1, M Zoch 2, K Jain 3; shot put – D Callaghan 1, K. Jain 2, M Zoch 3.

U7: 70 m – M Barlett 1, K Jennion 2; long jump – M Barlett 1, K Jennion 2; shot put – M Bartlett 1, K Jennion 2, P Ireland 3.

U8: 60 m hurdles A Zoch 1, L Roewer 2, J Sporle 3; lOO m – J Sporle 1, A. Zoch 2, T Jain 3; long jump – A Zoch 1, I Roewer 2, J Smith 3; discus – J Smith 1, T Jain 2.

U9: 60 m hurdles A Williams 1, D Mulroney 2, K Nicholls 3; lOOm – A Williams 1, D Mulroney 2, K Zoch 3; long jump – A Williams 1; D Mulroney 2, K Nicholls 3; shot put – A Williams 1, K Nicholls 2.

U1O: 60 m hurdles – J Zoch 1, D Delaney 2; M Frampton 3; 1OOm J Zoch 1, D Delaney 2, M Frampton 3; long jump M Frampton 1, L Murphy 2, D Delaney 3; discus – D Delaney 1, M Frampton 2, T Bannerman 3.

U11: 90 m hurdles S Beel 1, J Zoch 2; 200 m – S Beel 1, J Zoch 2, L Murphy 3; long jump – J Zoch 1, S Beel 2; shot put – D Delaney 1, T Bannerman 2, S Beel 3; high jump – J Zoch 1, S Beel 2.

U12. 20O m – M Greer 1; high jump – M Greer 1.

Open age: 800 m – N McCarroll 1; discus – N McCarroll 1.
BOYS

U5: 70m D Sowden 1; long jump – D Sowden 1; shot put – D Sowden 1.

U6: 70 m – P Gibson 1, S. Mele 2, B Sowden 3; long jump – B Sowden 1, J Rowe 2, L Emonson 3; shot put – S. Mele 1, J Rowe 2, J Emonson 3.

U7: 70 m – D Knezevic 1, S. Primrose 2, J Calleja 3; long jump – D Knezevic 1, J Calleja 2, C Martin 3; shot put – D Knezevic 1, S OÕCallaghan 2, J Rowe 3.

U8: 60 m hurdles – M Vidal 1, M Gibson 2, A Blandford 3; 1OO m – M Vidal 1, M Gibson 2, A Blandford 3; long jump – M Vidal 1, S McNamara 2, M Gibson 3; discus – M Vidal 1, G Kuret 2, G OÕCallaghan 3.

U9: 60 m hurdles – L Kuret 1, D Mele 2, B Fraser 3; 100 m – D Mele 1, L Kuret 2, B Fraser 3; long jump – D Mele 1, S Walter 2, L Kuret 3; shot put – D Mele 1, L Kuret 2, S Walter 3;

UIO: 60m hurdles – C Holland 1, S Murray 2, R Rowe 3; 1OO m – C Holland 1, G Boyd 2, A Vidal 3; long jump C Holland 1, A Vidal 2, R Rowe 3; discus – R Rowe 1, A Vidal 2; C Holland 3.

U11: 90 m hurdles – S Kuret 1, T Goodman 2, D Frampton 3; 200 m – S Kuret 1, J Humm 2, T Goodman 3; high jump – S Kuret 1, C Holland 2, D Frampton 3; shot put – S Kuret 1, L Finn 2, D Frampton 3.

U12: 90 m hurdles – J Humm 1, D Lowell 2, C Jennion & M Van Zyl eq 3; 200 m – J Humm 1, C Jennion 2, A. Zoch 3; long jump – K Roewer 1, J Humm 2, L Zoch 3; discus – J Humm, 1, S Tanti 2, C Jennion 3.

Open age: 90 m hurdles – D McCarroll 1, T Frampton 2; 800 m – D McCarroll 1, C Jennion 2, G Boyd 3; high jump – D McCarroll 1, T Frampton 2; shot put – T. Frampton 1, D McCarroll 2; discus – T Frampton 1, D McCarroll 2.

Due to the very wet conditions of the oval last Saturday Little Aths was converted into a fun and fitness day.

This Saturday is the Christmas break-up day.

A fun run and treasure hunt will be held at Assumption at 10am, followed by a surprise visitor expected.

Parents are advised to have all registration monies paid up on this day, and are reminded children who are competing at Shepparton will have to pay $1.50 as soon as possible.

Little Aths will resume on January 4 at 9am sharp, and children in each area should determine who is coaching them for Shepparton and make an effort to be present.

Athletics in the 80’s – Part 1

 

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1983

Kilmore Free Press
Wednesday, 4 May 1983, page 8

Little Aths Told… Catch up with world thinking

An Australian gold medal winner has urged Little Athletics Centre members in the Kilmore district to “aim for the stars” in an attempt to raise the international standard at the sport.

Speaking at the highly successful annual presentation night of the Hume Little Athletics Centre, Garry Honey told the youngsters parents and friends of his rise through the Little Aths field to a place in the Australian team which completed at the Olympic Games in Moscow, and finally to winning a gold medal in the long jump at the Commonwealth Games in Brisbane last year.

He urge the children to remember Australia is one of the few countries to teach athletes to be good losers.

Endorsing a very positive outlook, he suggested Australia should catch up with world thinking, and children should be taught to be good winners, to reach for the stars, and bring athletics in Australia up to world standard.

Organisers were delighted that Garry Honey, former great Australian distance runner John Landy, and VFA umpires’ advisor Jim Chapman were able to be present to address the youngsters and to present trophies.

Mrs Fitzpatrick, the president of the Little Aths organisation, thanked the local committee for working hard to achieve a successful season.

She pointed out the youngsters had broken 55 records during the season.

Kilmore Shire President, Bob Macartney, declared the presentation time open after congratulating the children and organisers on their efforts.

He assured the gathering the J J Clancy Reserve at Kilmore would be available for Little Aths competition next season. This will give the organisers a “home” after being at Wandong and Assumption College grounds in the past two seasons.

Cr Macartney then presented several achievement awards to successful youngsters.

Compere Syd Bysouth introduced Jim Chapman, who presented the remaining achievement awards to children who competed during the season.

Special guest John Landy outlined the degree of dedication needed for an athlete to reach championship level.

He spoke of people who can inspire a young athlete, and of the need to train hard, and set high goals to be reached.

Mr Landy then presented special achievement awards to a boy and girl in each age group, and the two trophies to the most improved athletes overall – Sally Bradley and Tony Montgomery.

After Garry Honey emphasised the positive approach needed to raise the standard of athletics in Australia, he presented the first and runner-up trophies in each group.

 

Do You Remember? Assumption College Speech Day 1982

The following article featured in the Kilmore Free Press, Wednesday 22 December 1982, page 8.

Were you present? Did the Headmaster’s address impact on your life? Did he give good advice? Does it apply today? Did you enjoy your time at Kilmore’s Assumption College? What do others think?

Tough times … young people need to be resourceful and adaptive

Times are indeed tough for our young people, and they need to be resourceful and adaptive, while not becoming a “Jack of all trades and master of none”, Assumption College Headmaster, Brother Seamus O’Grady, said at the school’s annual speech day and prize-giving.

“The 90th year of the college’s existence has witnessed new developments in buildings, curriculum and student responsibilities. These are things that give us all much satisfaction, a feeling that the college is progressing, that it is adapting to meet the changing needs of our students and the society into which they must enter.

“But the life of the college has to be seen against the background of the world of the 80’s. An education that isolates itself from the context of its own society runs the risk of becoming increasingly irrelevant to the young people we serve.

“The gloom of recession hangs over our country, unemployment is taken for granted, even the drought has contributed to lowering our collective morale.

“Times are indeed tough for our young people. They need an education to at least year 11, which in turn can no longer be narrowly academic. “Career choosing” is the preserve of the intellectual elite. For most it is a question of adapting to what is available, rather than what they feel best suited for.

Security Not There

“Here you noticed how the term ‘dole bludger’ has dropped from our vocabulary and has been replaced by terms like ‘retrenchment’, ‘early retirement’, ‘job-creation’? Security is simply not available to many people.

“How does the school respond to this situation? On the one hand, it must to some extent shield its young ones from these harsh realities, to give them time to grow physically, mentally, emotionally … to give then an all too short space for being adolescent.

“With no time to dream visions of the future, our youth become too quickly disillusioned and disappearing. Small wonder that so many seek to live only for the present, indulge in drugs that numb the mind from reality.

On the other hand, school must gradually expose them to the complexities of life, the ambiguities of a society with which they must come to terms. This is no east task. It is a lot simpler to concentrate on reading, writing and arithmetic as some naive commentators claim to be the major function of a school.

“what advice can I give you parents? For a start, if you are comfortably secure, why not in a real spirit of Christian caring create jobs for young people? Give the young a chance to be productive. It will only cost you money!

“Secondly, be on guard against ‘single-issue education’, an education which focuses on only one aspect of the student’s development. A too narrow academic education – in itself no guarantee of adequate employment – may neglect the emotional and social aspects of human development, and produce a distorted human being incapable of entering a loving relationship.

“I am not suggesting that everyone should be a ‘Jack of all trades and master of none’, but, rather, that our young people need to be resourceful and adaptive.

Dignity and Value

“They are living in a world which regards change and new directions as commonplace in the human condition. Teachers and parents, drawing on experience and wisdom, need to ensure a balanced education is provided for the young people who are entering a society where survival may require a lot more than a job.

“ All activities that we enjoin on them should lead to a renewed sense of their own dignity and value, a quiet self-confidence, a warmth of character, and, importantly, a sense of humour. I guess Christ is still the best model of man to offer to young people.

“So schools and parents have to adapt. Caring for our young people requires a vision that are valuable beyond their productivity. We have to make greater efforts to discern their needs, capabilities and skills, to develop courses that address these needs, to work more closely with them as they move from the world of school to the world of work”, Brother Seamus said.