Category Archives: Do You Remember?

Identifying the Subjects of Photos

We have had a very encouraging response to the publication of these two photographs on our web site and in the local newspaper. Many people have contacted us with information about those involved.  The following is a collation of the various responses. There are still some unidentified faces and some disagreement as to who some of them were, so we are always happy to hear more suggestions. I have numbered all the individuals to make referring to them easier.

Deb Picture:

BACK ROW:

1

2 John Clancy

3 Don Comans

4 Pat McMahon

5 Brian Kelly

6

MIDDLE ROW:

7 Doreen Lawrence

8 Judith Hayes

9 Margaret McMahon

10 Patricia Kelly or Mary Minogue or Mary Kelly

11 June Comans

12 Melena Younghusband

13 Maree Clancy

FRONT ROW:

14 Margaret Hawes

15 Jim Butler

16 Eileen Butler

17 ? Rice

18

St Joseph’s Picture

BACK ROW:

1 ? Hansen

2 ? Hansen

3 Patrick Harrington

4

5 ?Walsh

6

7 John Stephenson

8 Phillip Clancy

9 John Deutscher

10 Charlie Hughes

11 Gary Davon

12 Peter Hughes

13 Michael Purdon

MIDDLE ROW:

14 ? Hansen

15 ? Hansen

16

17 John Harrington

18 Anthony Zanelli

19 Bernard McConnel

20

21 Ralph Zanetta or Patrick McNamara

22 ? Simpson

23

24 Ted Hurst

25

FRONT ROW:

26 Jimmy Miller

27 David Thomas

28

29 ? Chawaluk or Joseph halocki

30 Adrian Te Ve Luwe

31 Michael Skehan

32 Gavin Clancy

33 Jimmy Butler

34

35 John Moore or Gerard Allen

36 Martin Williams

37 Gerard  Wallace (Or Wallis)

38 Brian Wright

39 Ian Thomas

Cricket in Kilmore – 1986

Kilmore Free Press Wednesday, 17 September 1986, page 20

Cricket club to extend pavilion

Extensions costing approximately $30,000 will soon take place at Kilmore Cricket Club’s pavilion.

The extensions will provide added space for change rooms, functions, score box and kitchen renovations.

To enable the work to proceed, a small amount of additional finance is required.

The club is calling on community members and supporters to loan $50 (or multiples thereof) for up to five years.

These loans (or debentures) are fully repaid over the next five years.

Without some support from the community, the club may not he able to proceed within the next few months as planned.

Persons able to assist should contact treasurer Lawrie Boyd on 821271.

At the club’s recent annual meeting, Ray Cowell was re-elected as president for a second successive term.

Neale Wigney continues as secretary, and Lawrie Boyd as treasurer for yet another term.

Other committee members for 1986-87 are Barry Dixon, Merv Hanson, Rob Peterson, Alan Bensted, Denis Potts, Ashley Cardwell and Fred Baines.

The president thanked many committee members, cricketers and supporters for their encouragement, hard work and support during the previous season.

He noted that although on-field performances of teams – with the the exception of Under 16s – had been disappointing, the club has continued to be strong in administration and organisation.

This progress has led to planning for the building extensions to cater for the greatly increased number of teams, and the pleasing development of under-age cricket in Kilmore.

The first meeting of the new committee decided on the on-field leaders for 1986-97.

Lawrie Boyd continues as club coach, with Merv Hanson and Barry Dixon assistant coaches. All are very experienced cricketers, who are willing to help players of all ages to improve their performances.

Merv Hanson is the new ‘A’ grade captain, succeeding his brother Greg, with opening batsman Neale Wigney vice-captain.

Barry Dixon is again ‘B’ grade captain, with Ray Cowell his deputy.

Alan Bensted takes over as ‘C’ grade skipper, with Fred Baines vice-captain.

Training on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5 pm has begun and with the club struggling to obtain sufficient numbers, any newcomers will be very welcome.

There has already been strong interest from Under 16 players (training is on Wednesday evenings).

The committee hopes that those lads who have become too old for junior cricket will come along to practice and graduate to senior ranks this season.

The club is providing cricket for three senior teams, Under 16s, Under 13 and Under 10, and all who would like a game of cricket will be made very welcome.

Training dates for U13 and U1O will advertised shortly.

Stalwart Retires

One of the best known cricketers In the district has decided to retire.

Wallan stalwart Jim Coustley, who grew up at Darraweit Guim where he perfected his skills before eventually becoming a driving force with the Wallan club in the GDCA, has devoted 30 years to cricket.

He will be hard to replace, as he has held almost every position with the club on and off the field.

And what will Jim be doing this summer? Playing tennis!

Cricket in Kilmore

Cricket in Kilmore has a long and interesting history. The following articles were taken from the local press. Some of our readers might remember some of the names listed.

From: Kilmore Free Press, Thursday, 16 March 1966, page 1

CRICKET FINAL

Great effort by L Boyd (93)

The second day’s play in the final of the Kilmore and District Cricket Association between Darraweit and Kilmore at Wallan on Saturday last, left Darraweit still in a strong position, as the match ends on Saturday next, March 18.

After the first day’s play Darraweit had scored 227 for the loss of 9 wickets and failed to add to the score when play was resumed on Saturday last.

Kilmore’s innings was high-lighted by the splendid batting of Laurence Boyd in making 93 of the team’s total of 153. He batted very soundly and unselfishly in the interest of his team and it was unfortunate that he did not receive more support. With the exception of the partnership by Boyd and Bardella, which added 36 runs, Kilmore’s batsmen did not shape well. The efforts of several of the tailenders, however, was full of merit, particularly that of R Clark, who – although only scoring 7 – was associated with Boyd in a partnership of 42.

For Darraweit G Taylor took 5 wickets for 52.

With a lead of 74 on the first innings Darraweit commenced their second innings and at stumps had lost one wicket for 9 runs.

Consistent batting

In his last three innings Laurence Boyd, Kilmore, has scored 102 not out (against Wallan) 125 (against Wallan East) and 93 (against Darraweit). For Darraweit Jim Coustley has scored 95 (against Wallan) and 98 (against Kilmore) in his last two innings.

Details :-
DARRAWEIT First Innings
Total – 227
Second Innings
Jim Coustley not out 6
John Coustley lbw Summers 0
Extras 3
One wicket for 9

KILMORE First Innings
L Boyd b Breen 93
P Summers c H Davies
b John Coustley 8
P Hanson lbw b Taylor 17
I Bardella lbw b Taylor 6
G Clark c John Coustley
b Taylor 0
R Jolly c Taylor b Moore 4
D Earl c John Coustley
b Taylor 3
H DeNiet b Taylor 5
R Clark c Breen
b John Coustley 7
R Jackson not out 2
T Summers c Taylor b Breen 1
Extras 4
Total 153

Bowling – G Taylor 5-52, P Breen 2-25,
John Coustley 2-23, J Moore 1-33,
B Stockdale 0-16

The Kilmore Free Press of 23 March 1966 reported that Darraweit Guim won the final.

Six Unidentified School Children

SS_With_QueriesThis picture of the 1947 Kilmore State School class was published in ‘Kilmore Connections’ with a plea for identification. Most of the students have now been identified, thanks to Alison Thomson, but six remain without names. Alison has suggested that some of the unidentified children may have been visitors rather than long-term students at Kilmore.

Back row – Kevin Maher, Gordon Wilkie, Ron Lingard, unknown, Margaret Suttle, five unknown.

Middle Row – Dawn Buckley, Pam Clarke, Margaret Johnson, Nola Chapman, Lucy Crew, Malcolm McKenzie, Ron Goodman.

Front Row – Des Lingard, Tony Davern, Dorothy Buckley, Dianne Clarke, Robert Elliot, Alan Berry.

If anyone has any memories of the unidentified, we would love to hear from you.

Do You Remember? Kilmore, January 1970

The following featured in the Kilmore Free Press, Thursday 15 January 1970, page 4.

Here and There

Back to the grind for another year to bring you the latest and greatest.

We will try to present this column as regularly as possible during 1970, but please excuse us if it does not appear, as it all depends on time and space available.

____ X _____

Nice winter we are having this summer isn’t it?

How would you like to have paid big money to buy a milk bar at a beach resort, only to find holiday weather like we had?

But most of the beach belles got their sun tan under a ray lamp this season.

Thousands may have flocked to the bayside resorts expecting good beach weather, but judging by the number of cars passing through Kilmore, there were thousands who were awake to the un certainty of the Victorian climate and chose the country for their holidays.

Still can’t work out how that fellow seen in Sydney Street during the holidays managed to hang on to his trousers, after losing his belt, without dropping his armful of bottles.

Belt was still on the footpath the next day, but no sign of broken bottles.

Notice that Santa delivered a fair number of swimming pools to homes in Kilmore at Christmas.

We won’t need that proposed, delayed and almost forgotten public pool soon if he keeps that up each year!

Hear there is a move on to change Fighting Harada’s name to Dancing Harada after his fight last week with Australian champion Johnny Famechon. All the Jap. boy seemed to do was to hold our Johnny as if he wanted to dance… and then he was waltzed right out of the ring.

Local vet, Pat Mornane, has some pretty odd jobs to do at times, but one of his oddest came last week when he was called to remove a possum from a washing machine in the laundry of a Kilmore house.

Heard it said the other day that “Doc” Davon would probably be the first local fisherman to catch a fish which was larger around the girth than the angler who landed it.

See a quote by Shakespeare on the desk calendar yesterday read – “nature hath framed strange fellows in her time.” How very true!

Do You Remember? Assumption College Speech Day 1982

The following article featured in the Kilmore Free Press, Wednesday 22 December 1982, page 8.

Were you present? Did the Headmaster’s address impact on your life? Did he give good advice? Does it apply today? Did you enjoy your time at Kilmore’s Assumption College? What do others think?

Tough times … young people need to be resourceful and adaptive

Times are indeed tough for our young people, and they need to be resourceful and adaptive, while not becoming a “Jack of all trades and master of none”, Assumption College Headmaster, Brother Seamus O’Grady, said at the school’s annual speech day and prize-giving.

“The 90th year of the college’s existence has witnessed new developments in buildings, curriculum and student responsibilities. These are things that give us all much satisfaction, a feeling that the college is progressing, that it is adapting to meet the changing needs of our students and the society into which they must enter.

“But the life of the college has to be seen against the background of the world of the 80’s. An education that isolates itself from the context of its own society runs the risk of becoming increasingly irrelevant to the young people we serve.

“The gloom of recession hangs over our country, unemployment is taken for granted, even the drought has contributed to lowering our collective morale.

“Times are indeed tough for our young people. They need an education to at least year 11, which in turn can no longer be narrowly academic. “Career choosing” is the preserve of the intellectual elite. For most it is a question of adapting to what is available, rather than what they feel best suited for.

Security Not There

“Here you noticed how the term ‘dole bludger’ has dropped from our vocabulary and has been replaced by terms like ‘retrenchment’, ‘early retirement’, ‘job-creation’? Security is simply not available to many people.

“How does the school respond to this situation? On the one hand, it must to some extent shield its young ones from these harsh realities, to give them time to grow physically, mentally, emotionally … to give then an all too short space for being adolescent.

“With no time to dream visions of the future, our youth become too quickly disillusioned and disappearing. Small wonder that so many seek to live only for the present, indulge in drugs that numb the mind from reality.

On the other hand, school must gradually expose them to the complexities of life, the ambiguities of a society with which they must come to terms. This is no east task. It is a lot simpler to concentrate on reading, writing and arithmetic as some naive commentators claim to be the major function of a school.

“what advice can I give you parents? For a start, if you are comfortably secure, why not in a real spirit of Christian caring create jobs for young people? Give the young a chance to be productive. It will only cost you money!

“Secondly, be on guard against ‘single-issue education’, an education which focuses on only one aspect of the student’s development. A too narrow academic education – in itself no guarantee of adequate employment – may neglect the emotional and social aspects of human development, and produce a distorted human being incapable of entering a loving relationship.

“I am not suggesting that everyone should be a ‘Jack of all trades and master of none’, but, rather, that our young people need to be resourceful and adaptive.

Dignity and Value

“They are living in a world which regards change and new directions as commonplace in the human condition. Teachers and parents, drawing on experience and wisdom, need to ensure a balanced education is provided for the young people who are entering a society where survival may require a lot more than a job.

“ All activities that we enjoin on them should lead to a renewed sense of their own dignity and value, a quiet self-confidence, a warmth of character, and, importantly, a sense of humour. I guess Christ is still the best model of man to offer to young people.

“So schools and parents have to adapt. Caring for our young people requires a vision that are valuable beyond their productivity. We have to make greater efforts to discern their needs, capabilities and skills, to develop courses that address these needs, to work more closely with them as they move from the world of school to the world of work”, Brother Seamus said.