Tuesday Tip 19

No 19 – Newspapers

By far the most important web site for researching old Australia newspapers is the National Library of Australia site called Trove. This site has many sections, including old newspapers, which can be seen by clicking on the first link below. Although this page has a search facility, for newspapers it is best to use Trove’s advanced search page, click on second link below

https://trove.nla.gov.au/
https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/search?adv=y

Here you will be able to search and read the following Kilmore papers.

Kilmore Free Press and Bourke and Dalhousie Advertiser 1865
Kilmore Free Press and Counties of Bourke and Dalhousie Advertiser 1865-1868
Kilmore Free Press 1870-1954
Kilmore Advertiser 1915-1918

See several images below. Our Society holds the following newspapers on microfilm, although some runs are not complete.

Examiner and McIvor Weekly Journal – limited issues in 1856
Kilmore Advertiser 1874-1934
Kilmore Examiner – limited issues in 1856
Kilmore Free Press 1865-1970
Kilmore Standard of Freedom – five issues in 1855
Lancefield Chronicle 1870-1873
Lancefield Examiner 1872-1882
Lancefield Mercury 1876-1920

Also held are hard copies of

Kilmore Free Press 1966-30 August 2015 (ceased publication)
North Central Review 2004-Present

Grahame Thom, research officer KHS

KILMORE FREE PRESS – 11 NOVEMBER 1870
KILMORE ADVERTISER – 9 November 1917

 

KILMORE FREE PRESS – 9 SEPTEMBER 1954

 

 

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Guest Speaker 6 Feb 2018; Owen Smith: Two Smiths of Carrick

KILMORE HISTORICAL SOCIETY GENERAL MEETING
TUESDAY 6 FEBRUARY 2018

The first General Meeting for the year is on Tuesday 6th February at 7.30 pm in the Kilmore Courthouse – everyone is welcome.

Owen Smith is our guest speaker, presenting “Two Smiths of Carrick”. He will tell the story of two young Irish men who venture to the antipodes from their home town of Carrickmacross, in County Monaghan, in the north of Ireland at a time when their country was reeling from the deprivations of the Great Famine and British occupation.

One is from a privileged background and is soon teaching as Classics Master at Scotch College; the second a blacksmith, becomes a successful farmer and raises a family in Kilmore. We look forward to hearing Owen tell their stories.

The meeting will begin at 7:30 and end at approximately 9 – 9:30, with time for questions and general business.

Supper will be served after the meeting and all are welcome to participate.

Upcoming Events for 2018

Happy New Year!

We hope that everyone has had an enjoyable Christmas and New Year.

Whilst the Society does not re-open till February 6th, we would just like to provide a reminder of our upcoming meetings and talks when we do.

  • Tuesday, 6 February 2018: Owen Smith – ‘Two Smiths of Carrick’
  • Tuesday, 6 March 2018: Tour of Christ Church Anglican Church, Kilmore
  • Tuesday, 3 April 2018: Graeme Thom – ‘Is DNA useful in family history research?’
  • Tuesday, 1 May 2018: Allan Stute on the Stute Family

Meetings are held at the old Courthouse at 4 Powlett St, Kilmore (unless notified differently) and begin at 7:30 and end at approximately 9 – 9:30, with time for questions and general business.

Supper is served afterwards and all are welcome to participate.

KHS Open Day, 21 Oct 2017: History’s Mysteries

Police Station, Law Court, Post Office, Kilmore circa 1904

The  Kilmore Historical Society invites you to visit the Kilmore Courthouse on Saturday, 21st October, 2017 between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. to view our Historical Photographic Collection.

Many of these photographs are unidentified people or locations in Kilmore, Wallan and other local areas.

Maybe you can help us put names to some of them.

Enquiries:
Email : kilmorehistoricalsociety@gmail.com

Celebrating History Week 2017

Guest Speaker 3 October 2017; Kylie McKay and Bob Tomkins: Observations of a Long Lost Railway

KILMORE HISTORICAL SOCIETY GENERAL MEETING
TUESDAY 3 OCTOBER 2017

OBSERVATIONS OF A LONG LOST RAILWAY

Members of the Kilmore Historical Society and visitors are encouraged to attend our next General Meeting which will be held in the Kilmore Courthouse at 7.30 pm on Tuesday 3rd October. Railway enthusiasts will be particularly interested in the story that Kylie McKay and Bob Tomkins of the Romsey Lancefield and Districts Historical Society, have to tell.

This is the story of a long lost railway line which will be bought back to life in a new book to be published mid 2018. Kylie and Bob have spent the last two years photographing and researching the history of the long forgotten railway – some may say “white elephant” because it only lasted about 10 years.

In 1892 the first paying passenger on the new railway from Lancefield to Kilmore was Mr Robert Beasley and the only other occupant a cow – so not an auspicious beginning to a new service!

The two historians will have many more tales to tell and photographs to show – we look forward to seeing you!

Last month Trevor Close enlightened us on his visit to the Solomon Islands with photographs of the many aircraft and landing craft wrecks that still litter the island 75 years after the major battle of Guadalcanal between the allied forces and the Japanese was fought.

The Annual General Meeting saw the committee returned as for 2016/17 – however helpers are always welcome so come and join us any Tuesday between 10 am and 3 pm.

The meeting will begin at 7:30 and end at approximately 9 – 9:30, with time for questions and general business.

Supper will be served after the meeting and all are welcome to participate.

Centenary of WW1; Kilmore Remembers: John Hammond

Australian_Army_Rising_Sun_Badge_1904

John Hammond (known as Jack) was born on 7 July 1891 in Kilmore, the eldest child of hotelier Thomas and Alice Teresa Hammond (nee Mulvey). Thomas was the licensee of the Railway Hotel (now Macs) and his father John, the Red Lion. Jack was educated at Assumption College, Kilmore and then worked in the Kilmore Post Office from 1907.

Jack enlisted at Kilmore on May 1, 1916 and was allocated as a private, 3678, to the 8th Reinforcements, 29th Battalion. After basic training at Broadmeadows, he attended the Signals School for two months, and then left Melbourne on the Orsova on August 1, 1916 for Plymouth, England.

Jack undertook further training before joining his Battalion on the Western Front, France in January 1917. He probably was involved in defeating a German counter attack at Beaumetz on March 23. Then on March 28 Jack was admitted to hospital in Rouen with a septic right heel and did not return to the field till late August 1917. The 29th then took part in the Battle of Polygon Wood in late September 1917.

Jack took leave in England in January 1918 and in April he was again in a field hospital with scabies. On April 24, Jack was transferred to the 5th Division, Signals Company as a Sapper. He may have been running messages from the front line to Headquarters, and he probably took part in the second battle of Villers-Bretonneux which recaptured the town from the Germans in two days in late April.

The 5th Division then followed the retreating Germans during May towards the Somme, and on May 13, Jack was killed in action. He was buried in the Corbie Communal Cemetery Extension at Picardie, France. His family and fellow postal workers placed memorial notices in the Kilmore Advertiser on June 1, 1918.

Jack was awarded the 1914/15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. In addition his family received a Memorial Scroll, a Memorial Plaque, the King’s Message and Jack’s effects.

His sacrifice is recognised on the Kilmore War Memorial, the Kilmore Shire Honour Roll in the Memorial Hall, and the Assumption College Honour Roll.

Corbie Community Cemetery Extension, Somme, France

Reproduced in the North Central Review, 8 December 2015.

Centenary of WW1; Kilmore Remembers: Thomas Henry Zoch

Thomas Henry Zoch

Thomas Henry Zoch was born in Deniliquin, NSW, on Christmas Day 1893, the eldest son of Joseph Stephen and Annie Zoch (nee Skene). The Zoch family then moved to Euroa, Yea and Arcadia in Victoria. However young Tom was looked after by Zoch relatives in Pyalong where he went to school.

It appears that in June 1915 Tom tried to enlist in Melbourne but was asked to be medically examined again as his chest measurement was below standard. He was then accepted on July 5, 1915 in Melbourne. What is interesting is that he enlisted under the name John Foster, stated that both parents were deceased and gave his next of kin as a friend Charles Kincaid of Boisdale, Victoria.

After training Tom (known as John) left Melbourne on the Star of Victoria on September 10, 1915 as part of the 9th Reinforcements, 7th Battalion bound for Egypt. He had been made a private, number 2791.

Tom saw action late in the Gallipoli campaign, and on return to Alexandria in Egypt took part in further training. He was transferred to the newly formed 59th Battalion on February 24, 1916. This Battalion was mostly made up of men from rural Victoria.

Following a bout of influenza he was transferred to the Western Front in France in June 1916. On July 19, the 59th took part in its first major battle at Fromelles. Attacking in the first wave, the 59th suffered heavy casualties, and Tom was shot in his left knee. He was transferred to England where he received treatment, took leave and rejoined his Battalion in France in April 1917.

His injuries prompted a change back to his birth name. On August 17, 1916, the Army Records Office in Melbourne informed Tom’s next of kin, Charles Kincaid, that Tom had been injured. It would seem that Charles then decided to inform Tom’s parents as his father Joseph wrote to the Army in August informing them that John Foster was his son and his name was Thomas Henry Zoch. This letter describes the circumstances which caused Tom to use another name. Tom had accumulated a debt owed to a storekeeper and the storekeeper told Tom he would be jailed if he did not pay. Tom then ”ran away from home” and later joined the Army. On November 22, 1916 Thomas signed a statutory declaration saying he was Thomas Henry Zoch and the Army then altered his record.

Back in France, it is likely Tom took part in the Battle of Polygon Wood on September 26, 1917. With the collapse of Russia in October 1917, a major German offensive on the Western Front was expected in early 1918. This came in late March and the 5th Division moved to defend the sector around Corbie. During this defence, the 59th Battalion participated in the now legendary counter-attack at Villers-Bretonneux on 25 April. Tom was probably part of that attack.

Tom had experienced several bouts of sickness including during the rest of 1918. He returned to Melbourne on the Tras-os-Montes arriving on May 22, 1919. He was discharged from the army on July 15, 1919 after four years service.

Tom was awarded the 1914/15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His name is recorded on the Pyalong State School Honour Roll.

In 1922 Tom married Harriet Donovan and in April 1923 he gave his address as Anzac Ave, Seymour when applying for a War Service Homes grant. He received a carrier’s licence in 1923 but soon after worked for many years on the railways. Tom died in January 1967 at Prahan and was buried in Springvale Cemetery.

 

 

Reproduced in the North Central Review, 24 May 2016