Tag Archives: Kilmore

Guest Speaker 6 Feb 2018; Owen Smith: Two Smiths of Carrick

KILMORE HISTORICAL SOCIETY GENERAL MEETING
TUESDAY 6 FEBRUARY 2018

The first General Meeting for the year is on Tuesday 6th February at 7.30 pm in the Kilmore Courthouse – everyone is welcome.

Owen Smith is our guest speaker, presenting “Two Smiths of Carrick”. He will tell the story of two young Irish men who venture to the antipodes from their home town of Carrickmacross, in County Monaghan, in the north of Ireland at a time when their country was reeling from the deprivations of the Great Famine and British occupation.

One is from a privileged background and is soon teaching as Classics Master at Scotch College; the second a blacksmith, becomes a successful farmer and raises a family in Kilmore. We look forward to hearing Owen tell their stories.

The meeting will begin at 7:30 and end at approximately 9 – 9:30, with time for questions and general business.

Supper will be served after the meeting and all are welcome to participate.

Open House Tour: Historic Houses of Kilmore – 8 Apr

Saturday 8 April, 2017

10am – 4pm

Ranging from humble, beautifully restored cottages to substantial large homes, five owners of historic houses in Kilmore have very generously opened their homes to the public.

Tickets: $15 person/$25 couple/family – available at the Old Courthouse, 4 Powlett Street from 9.45am – 3pm

Fundraiser for Kilmore Historical Society
www. kilmorehistory.info
kilmorehistoricalsociety@gmail.com

Open House Flyer

Book – Sydney Street – Kilmore

Sydney_Street_Kilmore_Past_and_Present

Published in 2013 by the Kilmore Historical Society

This book contains twenty one “Past” photographs of Sydney Street, taken over the period 1860s to 1950s, together with twenty one “Present” photographs taken in 2011 showing the same views. Each photograph has a caption identifying buildings and businesses. All photographs are black and white. The book is approximately A5 in size.

Price $10.00

Postage within Australia $3

To obtain a copy of this book, download an order form can and send payment to:

The Secretary
Kilmore Historical Society,
P. O. Box 206,
Kilmore, Victoria, 3764
Australia

or visit the old Kilmore Courthouse, Tuesdays, 10 am – 3 pm.

Book – Kilmore : Those That Came Before

Those That Came Before

Kilmore: Those That Came Before by Heather Knight

Published in 2007 by the Kilmore Historical Society

This book of 254 pages is a collection of reminiscences of Kilmore which give a first hand account of life in Kilmore from the 1840s through to the 1960s. It has over 140 photographs & illustrations, many of them previously unpublished and two comprehensive indexes; a surname and a general index.

Through the words of those who were there, you will relive the horror that was “Black Thursday” and experience the fear of murderous bushrangers; be amazed at the passion aroused by the local elections; meet and admire the community spirited men and women that formed the institutions in Kilmore and shaped this community; be delighted in tales of a carefree, simple childhood and journey through the streets of Kilmore during the 19th century.

Discover a proud Kilmore, whose old residents fondly recall as “Old Kil-more”.

Price $40.00

Postage within Australia $18

To obtain a copy of this book you can download the order form and send payment to:

The Secretary
Kilmore Historical Society,
P. O. Box 206,
Kilmore, Victoria, 3764
Australia

or visit the old Kilmore Courthouse, Tuesdays, 10 am – 3 pm.

Book – Kilmore on the Sydney Road

Kilmore on the Sydney road by Maya V. Tucker

Hardback, 290 pages, published in 1988 by the Shire of Kilmore

Kilmore on the Sydney road is the story of a small country village, borough and Shire in Victoria. It is also a tribute to the pioneers who settled the district and struggled courageously to tame the land and give their children a better life than that provided by England, Ireland or Scotland.

How the pioneers built Victoria’s oldest inland town is entertainingly outlined in this book, from Hume and Hovell’s 1824 explorations to today’s development of a desirable rural environment close to Melbourne. Just some of the families remembered here include the Beveridges, Bossences, Butlers, Castles, Clancys, Crossleys, Drurys, Goods, Hudsons, Hunts, Kinnears, Meades, O’Donoghues, O’Dwyers, Smeatons, Stills, Stimsons, Sugdens, Taylors, and Trainors.

Since its beginnings as a sheep run in 1837 and William Rutledge’s Special Survey in 1841, Kilmore Shire has seen a gold rush boom as an early service town, rivalry between townsfolk and farmers, sectarianism which became increasingly hurtful during the Great War and the 1920s, its main street becoming the Hume Highway in 1,924, the Hume Freeway bypass creating explosive growth as a dormitory suburb, and the durability of regional institutions such as the Hospital and Assumption College. – Dust Jacket

Kilmore on the Sydney road by Maya V. Tucker was commissioned by the former Shire of Kilmore to mark its 150 years of history. It was published in 1988 during Australia’s Bicentennial year.

Price $35.00

Postage within Australia $18

To obtain a copy of this book you can download the order form and send payment to:

The Secretary
Kilmore Historical Society,
P. O. Box 206,
Kilmore, Victoria, 3764
Australia

or visit the old Kilmore Courthouse, Tuesdays, 10 am – 3 pm.

Centenary of WW1; Kilmore Remembers: Francis Patrick Anderson

Australian_Army_Rising_Sun_Badge_1904

Serial Number 9

Francis was the son of Gregory Grattam Anderson and Julia Frances McManus. He was born in Kilmore in 1893, and worked as a labourer.

At age 22 years, Francis enlisted at Ballarat on 29 January 1917 and was assigned as a private in the 39th Battalion. After training, Francis embarked from Melbourne on the “Ascanius” on 27 May 1916 for England.

On 6 November 1916 he was admitted to the Fargo Military Hospital in Wiltshire with pneumonia then transferred to nearby Bulford Manor Hospital on 16 November. He was mentioned in the Argus of 28 November 1916 as being seriously ill.

On 29 December 1916 he was discharged to duty and rejoined his Battalion on 28 January 1917 sailing from England on the “Princess Clementine” from Folkestone to Etaples in France to the 10th Training Battalion.

Francis was killed in action in the fields of Passchendaele, Belgium on 8 June 1917.  He received the British War Medal, the Victory Medal and 1914/15 Star. His name is recorded at Ypres (Menin Gate Memorial), the Kilmore War Memorial, Shire of Kilmore Honour Roll and the Shire of Pyalong Honour Roll.

Reproduced in the North Central Review, 19 May 2015, p10

Ypres Menin Gate Memorial. Source: Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. Source: Commonwealth War Graves Commission

 

Centenary of WW1; Kilmore Remembers: James Burston

James Burston who was promoted to Honorary Brigadier General after returning to Australia and Honorary Major General prior to retirement in 1920
Colonel James Burston was promoted to Honorary Brigadier General after returning to Australia and Honorary Major General prior to his retirement in 1920

Colonel

James Burston was the first born son (1856) of Samuel Burston and Sophy Keath, who married in Kilmore in 1855. There were 2 other children; George and Agnes. They lived on 5 blocks on the corner of Parade and Lamb Streets. They also had a business in Somerset House on the north east corner of Bourke and Sydney Streets which they sold after a short time and purchased “Oak Park” at Prospect Hill between Kilmore and Broadford.

The family were by this time in the malting business and moved to Flinders Street Melbourne where they bought up several other malting businesses including Victoria Breweries. James and George managed this business after the death of their father in 1886. James married Marianne McBean in Kilmore in 1883, and had 3 sons and 3 daughters.

James had joined the Victorian Volunteers and by 1885 was promoted to Captain of the 2nd Infantry Battalion. In 1897 as a Lieutenant Colonel he represented Victoria for the Diamond Jubilee Celebrations in London. He served in the Boer War.

In 1900 James was elected to the Melbourne City Council and was Mayor in 1908 and retired by 1912 but continued in public office as Chairman of the Officers Selection Board and on the board of the Bank of Victoria and others.

In 1915 James at the age of 58 was the Commander of the 2nd Infantry Brigade AIF, which saw service in Gallipoli. Deteriorating health saw him repatriated to Mudros on the Greek Island of Lemnos where he became Officer Commanding of Reinforcements. He was repatriated to Melbourne in 1916 and retired in 1920.

James died at his residence at Hawthorn on the 4 March 1920 and is buried in St. Kilda Cemetery. There is an ornate brass plaque in St. Paul’s Cathedral to his memory mentioning his Boer War service.

Reproduced in the North Central Review, 19 May 2015, p10

See also James Burston, Australian Dictionary of Biography

Centenary of WW1; Kilmore Remembers: Herbert Thomas Skehan

Australian_Army_Rising_Sun_Badge_1904

Private 2142

Herbert Thomas Skehan was born in Melbourne St, Kilmore on January 30, 1889, the eldest son of Patrick and Amy (nee Grose) Skehan. He was educated at Assumption College, Kilmore and graduated Dux of the school in 1909. Up until the time of his enlistment Herbert was a clerk in the tobacco trade in Melbourne and was engaged to be married.

Herbert enlisted at Broadmeadows on July 28, 1915 in the 3/29th Battalion, AIF. During training he was acting Corporal from 26 August to December 16, 1915. He embarked at Melbourne on the HMT Ballarat on February 18, 1916, and disembarked at Suez on March 22, 1916, and was taken on strength with the 29th Battalion on April 1, 1916.

The Battalion then transferred to the Western Front via Marseilles in June, where they took part in an attack against the German positions at Delange Farm in July, then held their positions for 11 days including a heavy counter attack.

During front line action Herbert was hospitalised with Influenza in November 1916 at Etaples, then again in hospital with frost bite in February 1917.  He was transferred to the 5th Army School from May 21 to 27, 1917. After returning to his Battalion Herbert took part in the Battle of Polygon Wood near Ypres in Belgium which commenced on September 26, 1917. He was killed in action on that day.

The following is an eyewitness account by Corporal W J Marshall, – He was killed by a shell at Polygon Wood, I saw his body soon after. He was buried in a shell hole near where he fell by a party from the company.  No cross was erected at the time, he was a machine gunner, and was in No: 5 Platoon, B. Company.

After the War Herbert’s remains were exhumed and re-buried at Ypres, Belgium, in the Duhallow ADS Cemetery. His father Patrick, as next of kin, received in 1921 a Memorial Scroll, Herbert’s British War Medal, Victory Medal and 1914/15 Star, and a photograph of his headstone. .

Herbert’s name is recorded on the Kilmore War Memorial, the Kilmore Shire Honour Roll at the Memorial Hall, and on the Assumption College Honour Roll.

Information provided by Phil Skehan, Kilmore

Reproduced in the North Central Review, 12 May 2015, p10

Duhallow A.D.S. Cemetery, Belgium. Source: Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Duhallow A.D.S. Cemetery, Belgium. Source: Commonwealth War Graves Commission

 

Do You Remember? Assumption College Speech Day 1982

The following article featured in the Kilmore Free Press, Wednesday 22 December 1982, page 8.

Were you present? Did the Headmaster’s address impact on your life? Did he give good advice? Does it apply today? Did you enjoy your time at Kilmore’s Assumption College? What do others think?

Tough times … young people need to be resourceful and adaptive

Times are indeed tough for our young people, and they need to be resourceful and adaptive, while not becoming a “Jack of all trades and master of none”, Assumption College Headmaster, Brother Seamus O’Grady, said at the school’s annual speech day and prize-giving.

“The 90th year of the college’s existence has witnessed new developments in buildings, curriculum and student responsibilities. These are things that give us all much satisfaction, a feeling that the college is progressing, that it is adapting to meet the changing needs of our students and the society into which they must enter.

“But the life of the college has to be seen against the background of the world of the 80’s. An education that isolates itself from the context of its own society runs the risk of becoming increasingly irrelevant to the young people we serve.

“The gloom of recession hangs over our country, unemployment is taken for granted, even the drought has contributed to lowering our collective morale.

“Times are indeed tough for our young people. They need an education to at least year 11, which in turn can no longer be narrowly academic. “Career choosing” is the preserve of the intellectual elite. For most it is a question of adapting to what is available, rather than what they feel best suited for.

Security Not There

“Here you noticed how the term ‘dole bludger’ has dropped from our vocabulary and has been replaced by terms like ‘retrenchment’, ‘early retirement’, ‘job-creation’? Security is simply not available to many people.

“How does the school respond to this situation? On the one hand, it must to some extent shield its young ones from these harsh realities, to give them time to grow physically, mentally, emotionally … to give then an all too short space for being adolescent.

“With no time to dream visions of the future, our youth become too quickly disillusioned and disappearing. Small wonder that so many seek to live only for the present, indulge in drugs that numb the mind from reality.

On the other hand, school must gradually expose them to the complexities of life, the ambiguities of a society with which they must come to terms. This is no east task. It is a lot simpler to concentrate on reading, writing and arithmetic as some naive commentators claim to be the major function of a school.

“what advice can I give you parents? For a start, if you are comfortably secure, why not in a real spirit of Christian caring create jobs for young people? Give the young a chance to be productive. It will only cost you money!

“Secondly, be on guard against ‘single-issue education’, an education which focuses on only one aspect of the student’s development. A too narrow academic education – in itself no guarantee of adequate employment – may neglect the emotional and social aspects of human development, and produce a distorted human being incapable of entering a loving relationship.

“I am not suggesting that everyone should be a ‘Jack of all trades and master of none’, but, rather, that our young people need to be resourceful and adaptive.

Dignity and Value

“They are living in a world which regards change and new directions as commonplace in the human condition. Teachers and parents, drawing on experience and wisdom, need to ensure a balanced education is provided for the young people who are entering a society where survival may require a lot more than a job.

“ All activities that we enjoin on them should lead to a renewed sense of their own dignity and value, a quiet self-confidence, a warmth of character, and, importantly, a sense of humour. I guess Christ is still the best model of man to offer to young people.

“So schools and parents have to adapt. Caring for our young people requires a vision that are valuable beyond their productivity. We have to make greater efforts to discern their needs, capabilities and skills, to develop courses that address these needs, to work more closely with them as they move from the world of school to the world of work”, Brother Seamus said.

Centenary of WW1; Kilmore Remembers: Ralph Simon Johnston Knight

Private 4455

Ralph Simon Johnston Knight (pictured sitting with his bride) was born in January 1898 at Tantaraboo west of Kilmore, the sixth child of Nehemiah Knights and Alicia Jane Ann Johnston. Sometimes their surname is recorded as Knights but in his army records Ralph’s name is recorded as Knight.

Ralph probably worked on his father’s farm and others at Tantaraboo as a labourer before enlisting on 8 November 1915 at Melbourne. After training at Royal Park, Melbourne, Ralph joined the 21st Battalion in March 1917. His brothers Alby (4453) and Fred (4454) also enlisted about the same time and joined the 21st Battalion.

The 21st Battalion, 11th Reinforcements, including Ralph and his brothers, left Melbourne, on the RMS Orontes on 29 March 1916 for Egypt where he first served with the Anzac Police before joining the British Expeditionary Force to leave for the Western Front. He joined his Battalion in Belgium on 3 October 16 in the Posieres area.

Ralph became sick on 17 November with trench fever and was transferred on 3 December to England where he remained for eleven months attached to the 66th Battalion. He returned to his Battalion in France on 2 November 1917 in the Broodseinde area of the Western Front. On 30 November 17 Ralph’s knee became swollen with dermatitis; he rejoined his Battalion on 2 February 1918.

His Battalion was held in reserve for a rest in early 1918 but when taking part in defending against the German Spring Offensive, Ralph became sick with influenza in June 1918. He rejoined in August taking part in the Battle of Mont Saint-Quentin, then transferred to the 24th Battalion in October and proceeded on leave to England. On return to France Ralph was accidentally injured on 6 December 1918 in the left leg at Rouen. After treatment he transferred to England on 31 December 1918 and was on leave in February and March. Ralph left for Australia on 1 April on the Shropshire arriving Melbourne on 16 May and was discharged on 30 June 1919.

He received the British War Medal, the Victory Medal and 1914/15 Star. His name is recorded on the Shire of Kilmore Honour Roll, the Kilmore Church of England Honour Roll and the Tantaraboo State School Honour Roll.

Later in 1919 Ralph married Dorothy (Dot) Valentine Weaver and enlisted in the Victorian Police Force. He died at Rye in January 1978.

Photo of Ralph Simon Johnston Knight sitting with his bride Dot on right in 1919
Photo of Ralph Simon Johnston Knight sitting with his bride Dot on right in 1919

 

Reproduced in the North Central Review, 10 February 2015, p10

 

Ralph Simon Johnston Knight AWM DAOD1612
Ralph Simon Johnston Knight c. April 1916 (Photo: Australian War Memorial)